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My research focuses on questions related to Internet security and I am specifically interested in the intersection points of technology, security and gender. My work is interdisciplinary and I draw on different fields, stretching from International Relations, Gender Studies, Internet Studies to Cybersecurity.

Tech Abuse

I am Principal Investigator of the "Gender and IoT" pilot study which examines the implications of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies on victims of gender-based domestic violence and abuse. The research project was funded by UCL’s Social Science Plus+ scheme and is co-led by Dr Simon Parkin, Dr Trupti Patel and Professor George Danezis. The study is run in collaboration with the London Violence Against Women and Girls Consortium (VAWG), Privacy International, and the PETRAS IoT Research Hub.

Most recently, I have also become part of one of eight UK Research and Innovation (UKRI)-funded mental health networks. As member of the "Violence, Abuse and Mental Health: Opportunities for Change" (VAMHN) network led by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London, I will study how new digital technologies are changing people's experiences of abuse and how this impacts on mental health.

Internet of Things

From 2017 until 2018, I was Postdoctoral Research Associate for the EPSRC-funded PETRAS IoT Research Hub, a consortium of nine UK universities. I was part of its "Standards, Governance and Policy" stream and worked closely with stakeholders such as the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS), Pinsent Masons, and Lloyd's of London. My work explored the privacy and security challenges of IoT systems and resulted, amongst others, in analyses of emerging risks and opportunities, national and international governance developments, as well as IoT’s impact on informed consent.

Hacking and Hacktivism

In December 2016, I submitted my interdisciplinary PhD thesis with the title "Hacking (In)Security: Discourses and Practices of Politics, Technology and Activism". In the course of my PhD, I merged Critical Security Studies theory with the digital realm. My research examined the (in)securitisation of hacking and hacktivism. The emphasis lied on the European Union. The PhD project investigated the sphere of politics and bureaucracy, the industrial cybersecurity sector and self-identified hackers and hacktivists.

In doing so, I studied distinct perceptions on hacking and hacktivism and identified (in)security discourses and practices within the governmental, corporate as well as civil society level. The PhD research compared these varying perspectives and determines how these viewpoints contradict or overlap. The thesis gives an insight into the social construction of security risks and (in)security practices. It further fosters a more critical engagement with the framing of security threats and the ongoing cybersecurity developments in general.

Further Interests

Some of my other research projects included studies on the Pirate Party of Austria, Computer Security Incident Response Teams (CSIRTs), gender stereotypes within the hacktivist community, and sexism online. I also developed a passion for the analysis of censorship and surveillance and am outspoken about security issues within academia. I have also dipped my toe into new waters such as cyber insurance and security training/education.

Please consult my list of publications for further details on my scholarly work.

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